Interior Painting

The most successful method is, first to saturate the surface with olive-oil, then apply a solution of gum arabic in boiling alcohol. This mode of varnishing is equally brilliant, if not superior, to that employed by the French in their most elaborate works. But another mode may be substituted, which has less the appearance of a hard varnish, and may always be applied so as to restore the pristine beauty of the furniture by a little manual labor. Heat a gallon of water, in which dissolve one pound and a half of potash ; add a pound of virgin wax, boiling the whole for half an hour, then suffering it to cool, when the wax will float on the surface. Put the wax into a morter, and tritrate it with a marble pestle, adding soft water to it until it forms a soft paste, which, laid neatly on furniture, or even on paintings, and carefully rubbed when dry with a woolen rag gives a polish of great brilliancy, without the harshness or the dryer varnishes.

POLISH FOR NEW FURNITURE.

Dissolve gums coal and shellac, in proof alcohol, of each two ounces ; dragon’s blood, one ounce ; to be kept in a warm place in an air-tight jug or bottle. This polish should be applied with a sponge; your room to be warm, say from 75 to 80 degrees temperature. The work will require from three to tour coats in succession, say twenty minutes apart. Wet your rubber in alcohol, and rub briskly over the surface ; after this operation, you will go over the surface with a piece of beef tallow ; dust on superfine pumice-stone from a bag made of coarse woolen flannel, and rub it with felt or the heel of the hand. Wipe off with cotton cloth. Repeat the last operation, substituting Tripoli or rotten -stone.

STAIN FOR BEDSTEADS, ETC., IN IMITATION OF BLACK WALNUT

Dissolve pulverized gum asphaltum in spirits of turpentine, in this proportion : Two pounds of gum to one gallon of the liquid, the ingredients to be put in a closely cov-ered iron kettle, and placed upon a stove or furnace with moderate heat, stirring frequently until dissolved pour the whole into a stone jug while hot, reducing with turpentine to the desired con-sistency for use. You can produce any desired snacle, as the greater the number of coats, the darker the work. By adding a small quantity of lamp-black, you will have a jet. Should your work spot, it can be obviated by adding a little copal or shellac varnish.

 

Spread the word. Share this post!